Zion National Park Accommodations, Hotels, Vacation Rentals & Lodging

Angels Landing, known earlier as the Temple of Aeolus, is a 1,488-foot (454 m) tall rock formation in Zion National Park in southern Utah. A trail, cut into solid rock in 1926, leads to the top of Angels Landing and provides a spectacular view of Zion Canyon.

The Trail:
The trail to Angels Landing is 2.4 miles (3.9 km) long. It begins at the Grotto drop off point on the park’s shuttle system. It roughly follows the path of the Virgin River for some time, slowly gaining elevation in sandy terrain. As the trail gets steeper and leaves behind the river, it becomes paved. After a series of steep switchbacks, the trail goes through the area between Angels Landing and the Zion Canyon that is a gradual ascent. Walter’s Wiggles, a series of 21 steep switchbacks, are the last hurdle before Scout Lookout. Scout Lookout is generally the turnaround point for those who are unwilling to make the final summit push to the top of Angels Landing. The last half-mile of the trail is strenuous and littered with sharp drop offs and narrow paths. Chains to grip are provided for portions of the last half-mile to the top at 5,790 feet (1,760 m).

According to the National Park Service, “The route to Angels Landing involves travel along a steep, narrow ridge with support chains anchored intermittently along the route. Footing can be slippery even when the rock is dry. Unevenly surfaced steps are cut into the rock with major cliff dropoffs adjacent. Keep off when it is wet, icy or thunderstorms are in the area. Plan to be off before dark. Younger children should skip this trail; older children must be closely supervised.” The National Park Service website officially recognizes five fatalities where suspicious activity was not involved along Angels Landing, however other deaths have been reported.
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2 replies
  1. LilNiceWolf
    LilNiceWolf says:

    OMG! Those huge drops surrounding the very narrow trial made me dizzy! You were lucky not to face two baby carriages moving side by side in the opposite direction with two unpolite and stubborn drivers unwilling to give any space to people they meet! I guess you don't have any predisposition to vertigo! How long way was it from thi location to the closest bathroom? Did you see any people in urgent need using the drops to ease their burden?

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